Monitoring Procedures

The SCWIB has oversight and monitoring practices that follow the standards set forth by the Department of Labor & Industry. Procedures can be seen for the Workforce Investment Act (WIA) and Youth Programs here:

WIA Procedures Manual PDF

WIA Youth Program Procedures Manual PDF

ITA Policy

Individual training accounts (ITAs) can be used for tuition, books, uniforms, tools, and other required costs and fees associated with approved training programs, for a period of up to two years. Eligibility under the federal Workforce Investment Act (WIA) must be established for an individual to receive an ITA. Individuals in default of a student loan are not eligible. The maximum amount (cap) for ITAs is $8,000. Training programs must be on the statewide training programs/providers list to be approved.

When ITA funds are limited, the following priority policies apply:

  • Dislocated workers: Eligible customers whose primary residence is located in the Southwest Corner Workforce Investment Area – which includes Washington, Greene, and Beaver counties – are given priority.
  • Adults: Eligible customers whose primary residence is located in the Southwest Corner Workforce Investment Area – which includes Washington, Greene, and Beaver counties – and who are economically disadvantaged are given priority.

Customers who are employed can qualify for an ITA if they fail to meet our criteria for “self-sufficiency” which is based on the standard developed by PathWays PA.

Note: Our priority of service policy supersedes our self-sufficiency policy so lack of self-sufficiency does not guarantee receipt of an ITA.

Priority Of Service

The following priority of service policies apply only when funds are limited (see definition, below) and no additional funding (e.g., stimulus funds) are available:

When ITA funds are limited, the following priority policies apply:

  • WIA Title I Adult: priority is given to public assistance recipients and other low-income individuals who are at or below the poverty income level or 70% of the lower living standard income level.
  • WIA Title I Dislocated Worker: priority is given to individuals who reside in the Southwest Corner Workforce Investment Area (i.e. principle dwelling or home located in Washington, Greene or Beaver counties).

Within these parameters, individuals are served on a first come first served basis.

The Jobs for Veterans Act creates a priority of service for veterans who meet the eligibility requirements for participation in training programs administered by the US Department of Labor (DOL), including WIA Title I and National Emergency Grants. According to DOL Training and Employment Guidance Letter Number 5¬03, “local programs are not required to change their allocations among services to reserve funds for veterans, but are required to ensure that eligible veteran workers are given priority over non¬veterans for all available services.”

In our area, veterans receive priority service in that they are matched to job orders before any other jobseeker matches are performed. In addition, each PA CareerLink site has a local employment veterans’ representative onsite (see VI¬C, above).

Note: In accordance with 20 CFR part 1010. Section 310 (b)(3), when the veteran’s priority is applied in conjunction with the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act’s priority for recipients of public assistance and low income individuals, veterans and eligible spouses who are members of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act priority group will receive the highest priority within the priority groups, followed by non¬veteran members of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act priority group

Individual training accounts (ITAs): When ITA funds are limited, the following priority policies apply:

  • Dislocated workers: Eligible customers whose primary residence is located in the Southwest Corner Workforce Investment Area – which includes Washington, Greene, and Beaver counties – are given priority.
  • Adults: Eligible customers whose primary residence is located in the Southwest Corner Workforce Investment Area – which includes Washington, Greene, and Beaver counties – are given priority.

OJT Policy

Our WIA Title I contractors use OJTs to encourage employers to hire new workers who lack certain skills, knowledge or experience that can be acquired on the job within a relatively short time frame. In exchange for assuming the costs associated with providing the necessary training, employers are reimbursed for up to 50% of the wages they pay to OJT employees, with a limit of $8000 per employee. The OJT employee must be employed fulltime (i.e., at least 30 hours a week) and paid at least minimum wage. The length of training is determined by the specific vocational preparation level for the occupation, as defined by the US Department of Labor, and the employee’s prior experience in relation to the specific position, but cannot exceed six months. Employers are expected to retain the OJT employee after the training period is over unless there are legitimate grounds for termination. Employers who fail to provide continued employment may be ineligible for subsequent OJT contracts The provision of OJTs is subject to funding.

High Priority Occupation List

To compete in today’s global economy, businesses need a skilled workforce and our citizens need increasingly advanced training and knowledge. In the past, many workforce education and training programs were not aligned with skill needs and job openings in our economy. Pennsylvania’s new workforce development strategy seeks to change that by targeting education and training dollars to High Priority Occupations: job categories that are in demand by employers, have higher skill needs and are most likely to provide family-sustaining wages.

  • To see a list of the 2009 High Priority Occupations for the Southwest Corner Workforce Investment Area,
  • To read more about High Priority Occupations in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania

SCWIB Programs

The SCWIB administers services to adults, dislocated workers, and youth in Beaver, Greene, and Washington Counties. Programs are in place to enhance job search opportunities and career exploration through classroom training, on-the-job training, and placement services

  • To read more about Title I Providers, Click Here

SCWIB Youth Council

The SCWIB Youth Council oversees and administers youth programs in the Southwest Corner Workforce Investment Area. Roles of the Youth Council include oversight of youth programs; release, review, and awarding of RFPs for youth services; and ensuring that youth programs are providing the necessary services to serve the youth of the Southwest Corner.

Linda Andrews

Tim Veith

Darla Openbrier

Nancy Davis

WCCC (non-member)